Oliver's Profile

Discussions Oliver is involved in

  • Win a PS3 and Assassin's Creed Revelations

    Last post: Oliver on 19.10.11 at 00:01 | Started by Bayard on 11.10.11

    Love to be in. Thanks guys! This is probably the best comp in the world, even with the GFC. Good stuff. More about Win a PS3 and Assassin's Creed Revelations

  • Muscle Soreness: Can You Prevent Muscle Soreness From Exercise

    Last post: Oliver on 25.07.11 at 11:57 | Started by matt lark on 20.07.11

    I've been weight training for fitness for about 4 years and while massages are great they are often expensive. To alleviate next-day soreness start by helping your muscles to heal faster. Water has been mentioned and is extremely important, but whey protein after workout is the best way to help your muscles recover quickly and positively. If you care enough to read these posts you probably have some sort of fitness regime in place, and given the benefits you should definitely be taking post-workout protein supplements. I hope I'm preaching to the converted here.. More about Muscle Soreness: Can You Prevent Muscle Soreness From Exercise

  • Win all of Frank's Home Bar Essentials

    Last post: Oliver on 01.04.11 at 11:42 | Started by Steff S on 28.03.11

    It was my 21st birthday a few weeks ago, and I'm yet to have a party. If I won this package I would invite 30-40 of my close friends around and have a cocktail party and 'fine-dining' BBQ. Some of my friends are barmen so some classy and interesting drinks will be served up. Some of my friends are exotic dancers... so it'll be a good night. Favourites - 3 serves of Dolin Blanc with a splash of tonic and half a lime smells like summer. Or El Jimador, neat. More about Win all of Frank's Home Bar Essentials

  • Ratings? We Don't Need No Drinkin' Ratings

    Last post: Oliver on 14.03.11 at 01:50 | Started by Timotheus on 15.10.10

    Yea, this is a huge issue, especially when the difference between a wine with "RP96" and "RP98" can be a couple of thousand dollars. The ratings systems has the strongest effect on international wine sales, in particular for Champagne and Bordeaux. Wine Spectator and Robert Parker essentially dictate what vineyards will make mega-profits one year, and which will falter. We are fortunate in New Zealand that this hasn't really taken hold yet. Stickers like "Bronze- New World wine awards" clutter the labels of many otherwise nice bottles, but most purchasers understand that they can't take much from this. "Bronze" generally means it was one of the poorer wines showing, and the plethora of competitions available dilutes the strength of the vintners claims. Unfortunately, some less experienced drinkers can be suckered by this kind of marketing - but I suppose they will figure it out some day! More about Ratings? We Don't Need No Drinkin' Ratings

  • Sugar on Top: the Basics of Dessert Wines

    Last post: Oliver on 14.03.11 at 01:50 | Started by samala on 26.08.10

    Desert wine is a sticky treat, but can be fickle friend. Many popular New Zealand desert wines are late harvest reislings and late harvest pinot gris. Buyer beware that there is a huge difference in sweetness between these and most Ice wines. Botrytised (or noble) wines are amazing, imparting incredible flavours often of wheat and honey, and NZ is becoming very good at producing these. My pick of the NZ bunch is the Vinoptima Noble Gewurtztraminer, recently sold out at the vineyard and worth its weight in gold, try to pick some up at your off licence. Also remember that Pedro Ximenez sherry is generally the richest, sweetest drink that pairs exquisitely with tiramisu. Yum. More about Sugar on Top: the Basics of Dessert Wines

  • Motorcyclist Races Through City Traffic

    Last post: Oliver on 14.03.11 at 01:49 | Started by Nutta Pete on 29.09.10

    "An error occurred, please try again later." More about Motorcyclist Races Through City Traffic

  • Ratings? We Don't Need No Drinkin' Ratings

    Last post: Oliver on 14.03.11 at 01:47 | Started by Timotheus on 15.10.10

    Yea, this is a huge issue, especially when the difference between a wine with "RP96" and "RP98" can be a couple of thousand dollars. The ratings systems has the strongest effect on international wine sales, in particular for Champagne and Bordeaux. Wine Spectator and Robert Parker essentially dictate what vineyards will make mega-profits one year, and which will falter. We are fortunate in New Zealand that this hasn't really taken hold yet. Stickers like "Bronze- New World wine awards" clutter the labels of many otherwise nice bottles, but most purchasers understand that they can't take much from this. "Bronze" generally means it was one of the poorer wines showing, and the plethora of competitions available dilutes the strength of the vintners claims. Unfortunately, some less experienced drinkers can be suckered by this kind of marketing - but I suppose they will figure it out some day! More about Ratings? We Don't Need No Drinkin' Ratings

  • Sugar on Top: the Basics of Dessert Wines

    Last post: Oliver on 14.03.11 at 01:47 | Started by samala on 26.08.10

    Desert wine is a sticky treat, but can be fickle friend. Many popular New Zealand desert wines are late harvest reislings and late harvest pinot gris. Buyer beware that there is a huge difference in sweetness between these and most Ice wines. Botrytised (or noble) wines are amazing, imparting incredible flavours often of wheat and honey, and NZ is becoming very good at producing these. My pick of the NZ bunch is the Vinoptima Noble Gewurtztraminer, recently sold out at the vineyard and worth its weight in gold, try to pick some up at your off licence. Also remember that Pedro Ximenez sherry is generally the richest, sweetest drink that pairs exquisitely with tiramisu. Yum. More about Sugar on Top: the Basics of Dessert Wines

  • Motorcyclist Races Through City Traffic

    Last post: Oliver on 14.03.11 at 01:47 | Started by Nutta Pete on 29.09.10

    "An error occurred, please try again later." More about Motorcyclist Races Through City Traffic

  • Fishhooks on the foreshore

    Last post: Oliver on 14.03.11 at 01:46 | Started by Kieran on 08.09.10

    Correct, finality is very important, both for the financial security of the government and for the cultural unity that will hopefully be instilled. It must be remembered of course, that the government will ALWAYS have the power to revoke this proposed law. Should public policy sway violently, the government can easily pass an Act re-opening the right to claims. That is how this Bill must be viewed - with a mind toward the democratic freedoms of our executive government. However Maori may state that this Bill stifles their ability to claim, it will always be true that if 'New Zealanders' believe that Maori claims are genuine, just, and correspond to our moral belief of rightousness, the claims process can be resurrected. This Bill would not be as finite as Maori with potential legitimate claims fear. More about Fishhooks on the foreshore

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